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5 Killer Tips For Engaging Your Facebook Followers

Facebook_EngagementFacebook is a vital tool for marketing your business, but it can be tricky to gain visibility for posts on your page. In 2014, Facebook made some changes that directly affect how your posts appear (or don't appear) on News Feeds. 

The short, short story is that in order to create a good user experience for their customers, Facebook doesn't want "pushy" content to appear on users' News Feeds. Instead, they favor valuable content from businesses that users actually want to see. 

But what does it mean to produce valuable content? Here are five Facebook best practices to make sure that content on your page is seen by as many of your followers as possible:

1. Tell Great Stories

Few things engage an audience as well as a good story, especially if it's something humorous or inspiring. Your customers are the best source for stories - chances are that if you're providing them with a valuable service, you've made their lives better in some way. Intel does a great job with spotlighting how their product benefits their customers. 

2. Don't Focus on Yourself

Content that is obviously a sales pitch isn't likely to engage your audience. Be honest, do you like when people try to sell you things? We don't either. Your followers didn't "Like" your page because they wanted to see a bunch of ads; they want to see material that adds interest and value to their lives. Telling good stories will help with this. 

3. Use Video 

There are over 3 billion video views on Facebook every day. If you're wondering how to engage your Facebook followers, video is your answer. A 15-second video of a customer of yours who recently accomplished something great should perform very well. Live Video, Facebook's newest hot thing, is highly engaging and we recommend giving it a shot.

4. Know Your Audience

If your followers are primarily 40-year old mothers, don't create content that looks like it's promoting a death metal album. If you're not sure what kind of folks are engaging with you on Facebook, take a look at Facebook's Insights information about your Page. Insights can also clue you in on when and how often to post on Facebook.

5. Promote Check-Ins

Two things:

  1. Facebook check-ins are typically seen by 150-200 friends of one of your customers, so they're a great way to promote word-of-mouth referrals about your business. 
  2. When people start checking in, all that activity signals to Facebook that people are interested in you. Your content is shown to more people as a result. Make sure you have Notifications turned on to see when people are checking in. 

Here's an example of a post we did that hits some of the points above. Even though we talk about our own program, we're not trying to sell anything. The video is simply a way to add some humor to our audience's day! 




How Do You Increase Facebook Engagement?

Have some tips of your own that you'd like to share? Comment below to tell us what's worked well for you, and we'll feature your advice in a future blog post.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

John Rougeux

John is co-founder and CMO at Causely. When he's not trying to build the most philanthropic company in the world, he's probably hanging out with his wife and three daughters in Lexington, KY. You can also find John on Twitter and LinkedIn.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Matthew Watson

Matt is Customer Success Manager at Causely, where he does everything in his power to help our customers succeed. He loves sports, his wife, his dog, and the great outdoors, but not in that order. He may love his dog more than sports. You can find Matt on Facebook and Twitter.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Sarah Werner

Sarah is a writer, marketer, and brand specialist. She has experience in both non-profit marketing and financial development as well as for-profit content marketing and social media. She holds degrees in English and Art from Asbury University. When she’s not writing content for Causely, you’ll find her outside with a book or camera enjoying the company of trees. You can also find Sarah on Twitter, Instagram and LinkedIn.

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